The Exemplary Legacy of the Chicago Defender

This week, the Chicago Defender, one of the most renowned black newspapers in America, will cease to produce a print edition. Though it will continue to publish online, the demise of the Defender as a physical object, a hundred and fourteen years after its founding, marks another sad milestone in the decline of print newspapers.…

Read More

Kicked Off the Land

In the spring of 2011, the brothers Melvin Davis and Licurtis Reels were the talk of Carteret County, on the central coast of North Carolina. Some people said that the brothers were righteous; others thought that they had lost their minds. That March, Melvin and Licurtis stood in court and refused to leave the land…

Read More

Hampton University Is The First HBCU To Add A Varsity Women’s Triathlon Team

Last week, Hampton University stakeholders announced a new collaboration with USA Triathlon to add women’s triathlon to their roster of varsity sports. With this announcement, Hampton “becomes the first Historically Black College and University (HBCU) to participate in the sport on a varsity level, reports Hampton University News. Read more at Because of Them We Can.

Read More

Natural Hair Is Protected In California, But the Bias Is Far From Gone

For as long as she can remember, Hanna Wagari, a longtime resident of San Diego and the Director of Marketing for a multinational cosmetics company, has straightened her hair every time she’s had a job interview. “I feel that white people find me less intimidating and more likable when my hair is straight,” said Wagari,…

Read More

The Chicago Defender, Legendary Black Newspaper, Prints Last Copy

CHICAGO — Decade by decade, the newspaper told the story of black life in America. It took note of births and deaths, of graduations and weddings, of everything in between. Through eras of angst, its reporters dug into painful, dangerous stories, relaying grim details of lynchings, of clashes over school integration and of the shootings…

Read More

The ‘Chicago Defender,’ an Iconic Black Newspaper, to Release Its Last Print Issue

For nearly 115 years, the Chicago Defender has been a vital news source for African Americans in Chicago and beyond. At a time when Black voices were largely excluded from mainstream media platforms, the Defender covered both major events—the 1919 Chicago Race Riot, the murder of Emmett Till, the assassination of Martin Luther King Jr.—and the details of Black community…

Read More

Ta-Nehisi Coates Clapped Back at Mitch McConnell for Saying ‘No One Alive’ Is Liable for Reparations. So We Came Up With a List

On Wednesday, the House Judiciary Committee’s Subcommittee on the Constitution, Civil Rights and Civil Liberties held a hearing about H.R. 40, a proposal from Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee (D-Texas) that would authorize a national apology and study reparations for slavery and racial discrimination against black people in America. Among those testifying before the subcommittee was writer…

Read More