Flashback: Chicago’s first black alderman sat as the lone African-American voice on the city’s council — and then, Congress

Oscar Stanton De Priest had presence. Fair-skinned enough to pass for white, and standing at least 6 feet tall with white hair adorning his head, he was distinctly noticeable, “perhaps the most striking Negro in Chicago,” one Tribune reporter penned. But it was his presence as the only black person in national political leadership that…

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Full-length feature film to focus on life & legacy of Ida B. Wells

Local 24 News Reporter Rebecca Butcher had the chance to sit down with Daphene McFerren to discuss an upcoming, full-length feature surrounding the life and accomplishments of Ida B. Wells. Wells was an African-American investigative journalist in the 1800s who reported on lynchings in Memphis. She was an early leader in what became known as…

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Stepping Up and Standing Out: Women’s Political Participation in 2020

Women of all ages and political affiliations — particularly millennials and women of color—have become more politically engaged since 2016, a trend that is likely to continue in the 2020 cycle. Our new research gives further insights into what motivates women and how they plan to participate this year. Read more at Gender on the…

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Hanelle Culpepper To Make Trek History Directing Picard Series

Hanelle Culpepper is going where no woman has gone before. Culpepper will direct the opening two episodes of the upcoming untitled Star Trek/Jean-Luc Picard series from CBS All Access, making her the first female director to launch a new Star Trek series in the franchise’s 53-year history.  Read more at Startrek.com.

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What ‘Livability’ Looks Like for Black Women

Last September, the city of Pittsburgh released a report on gender and race disparities that concluded, perhaps to the city’s own shock, that Pittsburgh is the worst city for black women to live in by just about every metric. The aftermath of that bombshell was a bevy of columns and essays from black women either expressing vindication for…

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I am not ‘non-white’

“I’m black. I’ve been black, and proud to be black, my whole life. My parents raised me like that. They grew up as ‘Negroes.’ They had to drink at water fountains labeled ‘colored.’ They lived long enough to become Afro-Americans, and then African Americans. I was, and still am, militantly black. I’ve lived through the…

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Black Woman Dies After Waiting Hours in ER for Help

It is often suggested that women, especially black women, go ignored and/or unseen due to implicit bias in the American healthcare system. Such may have been the case for Tashonna Ward, a 25-year-old daycare teacher from Milwaukee who died Jan. 2 while trying to find a doctor to help her, USA Today reports. Ward waited for over two hours in…

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The ZORA Canon: The 100 greatest books ever written by African American women

TThe ZORA Canon, our list of the 100 greatest books ever written by African American women, is one of a kind, yet it exists within a rich cultural tradition. As author and New York Times contributing opinion writer Kaitlyn Greenidge notes in “Why We Need to Acknowledge the African American Women’s Canon,” her insightful and moving introduction to the…

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Little Man, Little Man: James Baldwin’s Only Children’s Book, Celebrating the Art of Seeing and Black Children’s Self-Esteem

“The greatest poet in the English language found his poetry where poetry is found: in the lives of the people,” James Baldwin (August 2, 1924–December 1, 1987) wrote in his superbly insightful essay on Shakespeare, language as a tool of love, and the writer’s responsibility in a divided society. But while “the people” of sixteenth-century Europe were very…

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