Uncategorized

In 2018, black women like Ayanna Pressley are fighting for political power — and winning

Ayanna Pressley pulled off an unexpected victory on Tuesday in the Democratic congressional primary in Massachusetts’s Seventh District, beating 10-term incumbent Rep. Michael Capuano with 59 percent of the vote. Barring a last-minute write-in campaign during the general election, Pressley will be unopposed in November and become the first black woman to represent Massachusetts in…

Read More

Who Do We Need as Mayor?

Last week, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel held a press conference to announce that he will not seek re-election in the 2019 Mayoral Race. The two-term mayor shocked residents, who had been bracing for a long political season as more than 9 candidates had already announced their campaigns. No clear front runner had been determined before…

Read More

Ida’s Legacy highlights the political journeys of four outstanding African-American women candidates during its “Legacy & Libations” summer mixer event

There are more black women running for local, state and federal offices than ever before in history. Four Chicago area women, who decided it was their turn, will take part in a discussion of their journeys as candidates for congress, attorney general, cook county commissioner and alderman Wednesday, Aug. 22, 2018, at Truth Italian Restaurant, 56 E.…

Read More

Hillary Clinton

“It’s not enough to thank black women, we need to support black women,” said Hillary Rodham Clinton, who did just that as keynote speaker for the first Ida’s Legacy luncheon, a fundraiser for electing the next generation of progressive African-American candidates. Read more at StreetWise.

Read More

Honors, at Last, for Ida B. Wells, ‘a Sword Among Lions’

Born in slavery in Mississippi in 1862, Wells grew up during Reconstruction, when constitutional rights were extended to formerly enslaved African-Americans. Black men participated in electoral politics throughout the former Confederacy. Wells took up her career as a journalist during a time “when the possibilities of racial inclusiveness and the power of unified, collective action were palpable,” the biographer Paula Giddings writes in “Ida:…

Read More

Ida B Wells: Long Overdue Salute

Story originally appeared on the July 22 newsletter of TBTNewsService.com Ida Bell Wells-Barnett (July 16, 1862 – March 25, 1931), more commonly known as Ida B. Wells, was an investigative journalist, educator, and an early leader in the Civil Rights Movement. She was one of the founders of the National Association for the Advancement of…

Read More

The Janus Ruling Is a Blow to Public Unions. It’s Especially Bad for Black Women.

The recent U.S. Supreme Court decision allowing employees to opt out of paying fees to the unions who represent them will impact public-sector unions across the country, potentially weakening their collective bargaining power. But the 5-4 ruling in the case, known as Janus v. AFSCME, could have an especially bad impact on African-American women, according to an analysis done…

Read More